Nature

Fox in the woods

Red fox in the Woods – video






Renard(vulpus vulpus)

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Roe deer

Deer
  • Nov 8, 2017
  • 9





European roe deer (Capreolus capreolus)

Video from the vetenarians in Stenay. Deer in the Woods of the North Meuse.

The European roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), also known as the western roe deer, chevreuil, or simply roe deer or roe, is a Eurasian species of deer. The male of the species is sometimes referred to as a roebuck. The roe deer is relatively small, reddish and grey-brown, and well-adapted to cold environments. The species is widespread in Europe, from the Mediterranean to Scandinavia and from Britain to the Caucasus and east to northern Iran and Iraq. It is distinct from the somewhat larger Siberian roe deer.

Within Europe, the European roe deer occurs in most areas, with the exception of northernmost Scandinavia (north of Narvik) and some of the islands, notably Iceland, Ireland, and the Mediterranean Sea islands; in the Mediterranean region, it is largely confined to mountainous regions, and is absent or rare at low altitudes. Scottish roe deer were introduced to the Lissadell Estate in Co. Sligo in Ireland around 1870 by Sir Henry Gore-Booth, Bt.[3] The Lissadell deer were noted for their occasional abnormal antlers and survived in that general area for about 50 years before they died out, and no roe deer currently exist in Ireland.

More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roe_deer

European honey buzzard

  • Nov 7, 2017
  • 10





The European honey buzzard (Pernis apivorus), also known as the pern or common pern,

Video from the vetenarians in Stenay. Honey buzzard in the Woods of the North Meuse.

The European honey buzzard (Pernis apivorus), also known as the pern or common pern, is a bird of prey in the family Accipitridae.Despite its English name, this species is more closely related to kites of the genera Leptodon and Chondrohierax than to true buzzards in Buteo. The binomen is due to Linné. It is derived from Ancient Greek pernes περνης, a term used by Aristotle for a bird of prey, and Latin apivorus “bee-eating”, from apis, “bee” and -vorus, “-eating”. In fact, bees are much less important than wasps in the birds’ diet.

The 52–60-centimetre (20–24 in)-long honey buzzard is larger and longer winged, with a 135–150-centimetre (53–59 in) wingspan, when compared to the smaller common buzzard (Buteo buteo). It appears longer necked with a small head, and soars on flat wings. It has a longer tail, which has fewer bars than the Buteo buzzard, usually with two narrow dark bars and a broad dark subterminal bar. The sexes can be distinguished on plumage, which is unusual for a large bird of prey. The male has a blue-grey head, while the female’s head is brown. The female is slightly larger and darker than the male.

More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_honey_buzzard

Raccoon

Raccoon
  • Nov 6, 2017
  • 9





Procyon (genus)

Video from the vetenarians in Stenay. Raccoon in the Woods of the North Meuse.

Procyon is a genus of nocturnal mammals, comprising three species commonly known as raccoons, in the family Procyonidae. The most familiar species, the common raccoon (P. lotor), is often known simply as “the” raccoon, as the two other raccoon species in the genus are native only to the tropics and less well known. Genetic studies have shown that the closest relatives of raccoons are the ring-tailed cats and cacomistles of genus Bassariscus from which they diverged about 10 million years ago.

Raccoons are unusual, for their thumbs (though not opposable) enable them to open many closed containers (such as garbage cans and doors). They are omnivores with a reputation for being clever and mischievous; their intelligence and dexterity equip them to survive in a wide range of environments and are one of the few medium-to-large-sized animals that have enlarged their range since human encroachment began (another is the coyote). Raccoon hindfeet are plantigrade similar to those of humans and bears. Raccoons are sometimes considered vermin or a nuisance. They have readily adapted to urban environments (compare urban opossums, skunks and foxes), scavenging garbage bins and other food sources.

More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Procyon_(genus)

wildcat (Felis silvestris)

wildcat (Felis silvestris)
  • Nov 5, 2017
  • 13





The wildcat (Felis silvestris)

Video from the vetenarians in Stenay. Wildkat in the Woods of the North Meuse.

The wildcat (Felis silvestris) is a small cat native to much of Africa, Europe, and Southwest and Central Asia into India, western China, and Mongolia. Because of its wide range it is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List since 2002. However, crossbreeding of wildcats and domestic cats (Felis silvestris catus) occurs in particular in Europe and is considered a potential threat for the preservation of the wild species.[1]

The wildcat shows a high degree of geographic variation. Whereas the Asiatic wildcat is spotted, the African wildcat is faintly striped, has short sandy-gray fur, banded legs, red-backed ears and a tapering tail. The European wildcat is striped, has long fur and a bushy tail with a rounded tip, and is larger than a domestic cat.[3]

The wildcat is the ancestor of the domestic cat. Genetic, morphological and archaeological evidence suggests that domestication of Old-World wildcats began approximately 7500 years BCE in the Fertile Crescent region of the Near East. The association of wildcats with humans appears to have developed along with the growth of agricultural villages during the Neolithic Revolution, with wildcats preying on rodents that infested the grain stores of early farmers.[2]

Until 2007, twenty-two subspecies of wildcat were recognised.[4] Since publication of results of a phylogeographical analysis, only five subspecific groups have been suggested, including the Chinese mountain cat.[1]

More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wildcat

Calcareous grassland

Calcareous grassland
  • Oct 2, 2017
  • 19

Calcareous grassland (or alkaline grassland) is an ecosystem associated with thin basic soil, such as that on chalk and limestone downland.[1] Plants on calcareous grassland are typically short and hardy, and include grasses and herbs such as clover. Calcareous grassland is an important habitat for insects, particularly butterflies, and is kept at a plagioclimax by grazing animals, usually sheep and sometimes cattle. Rabbits used to play a part but due to the onset of myxomatosis their numbers decreased so dramatically that they no longer have much of a grazing effect. read more

Nature Reserve Raymond Mayné – Torgny

kalkgras in Torgny en Villécloye
  • Sep 30, 2017
  • 21

Nature Reserve Raymond Mayné
Situated north of the village and facing south, the nature reserve stretches on a nearly-six-hectare surface; it belongs to the association “Ardenne et Gaume” and to the district of Rouvroy. It enjoys a warm and dry climate and consists of old quarries, limy lawns and thickets.
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